Wednesday Writing Prompt Challenge – October 18, 2017

Welcome to the Wednesday Writing Prompt Challenge! Join me in finding inspiration in unexpected places. Each week I post a new prompt intended to spark ideas for whatever writing project you’re working on—a journal entry, a poem, a short story. The possibilities are endless!

If you wish, consider sharing a link to your response in the comments below. There are a few simple rules, so please check them out below before posting.

Change your point of view. Maybe you’re bored with a story because you’re seeing it through the wrong character’s eyes. Try writing a few pages of the story from another person’s view. If it works better you may need to switch protagonists.

Thanks for playing along! Happy writing!

Rules for posting to Wednesday Writing Challenge:

  1. Must be family friendly.
  2. Hate and intolerance will not be accepted.
  3. No pornography, erotica, graphic violence or excessive profanity.

Have fun. Be creative. And let’s write more words!

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NaNo Prep for Non-Planners, Part Two: Characters

It’s week three of NaNo Prep month, and hopefully by now you have an idea you’re eager to run with. In part one, I wrote about generating ideas, and how to use various brainstorming exercises to help build your story. Were any of the exercises helpful to you? Did you come up with a premise for your novel?

This week, the focus is on characters. Characters are the heart of any novel. Without them to move the plot along there simply is no story. And in any story, there are typically at least two characters – the protagonist and the antagonist.

The protagonist is at the center of the story. They make the key decisions that propels the story forward. And they experience the consequences of those decisions. The antagonist then represents the opposing force against which the protagonist must contend.

There are many ways in a story to write the protagonist/antagonist relationship. There may be more than one protagonist, or multiple antagonists. The antagonist might not even be actual character, but a force of nature or corporate machine. Regardless of how your story will go, your characters are an integral part.

Interview your character
Since story is plot, and characters drive the plot, it’s important to spend some time getting to know the characters that will populate your story. The best way to get to know a character is to complete some sort of profile or interview with your characters. There are as many ways to do this as there are writers. If you don’t already have a character profile template, here are a few I found that range from a simple worksheet to a very elaborate profile.

Character Profile Worksheets
Questionnaires for Writing Character Profiles
Character Chart for Fiction Writers
Fiction Writer’s Character Chart 

Depending on your chosen genre, you may need to modify the profile template for age or even for non-human races such as elves, orcs or dragons. If you write fantasy, you might add questions about magical abilities or other related ideas.

How many characters does one novel need?
The answer to this question, of course, is going to depend on the story. Certainly, most novels need to contain at least two characters – the protagonist and the antagonist. Spend the most time on these two characters (or groups of characters, depending on the story), as they will drive the action. Don’t neglect the villain as this character is just as important to the story as the hero.

Your supporting cast could range from a few, to entire cities and worlds full of people. Again, the type and scope of your novel will determine this. More than likely you will need at least some characters outside the main two. How much time you spend on them before writing will depend on their importance to the story. Some you may want to do full profiles on, where others need little more than a name or title, and a cursory description.

If you are participating in NaNoWriMo, it can be a good idea to do minimal profiles on as many of your side characters as you can. At the very least, make a list of characters that may show up in your novel. Spend a little time now giving names to those surrounding your main characters and keep that list handy! If you need a great place to find names, here’s a great website: behindthename.com.

Your NaNo prep assignment for week three:
Use one of the character profile sheets linked above, or one of your own devising. Sit down with your characters one at a time, spending the most time on your protagonist and antagonist. Dig out as much detail on these characters as you can. What you learn here will help determine where your story will go.

Three questions to focus on this week:

  1. Who is your hero?
  2. Who is your villain?
  3. What (if any) supporting characters are necessary?

NaNo Prep month is already half over. We’ve established a workable idea, and we now have characters we love. Spend some time getting to know them better as you prepare to introduce them to the world. Next week we’ll start putting all the pieces together into a plot outline.

Happy writing!

Wednesday Writing Prompt Challenge – October 11, 2017

Welcome to the Wednesday Writing Prompt Challenge! Join me in finding inspiration in unexpected places. Each week I post a new prompt intended to spark ideas for whatever writing project you’re working on—a journal entry, a poem, a short story. The possibilities are endless!

If you wish, consider sharing a link to your response in the comments below. There are a few simple rules, so please check them out below before posting.

Recall your high school years. Write about one of the hardest experiences you had to deal with during that time.

Thanks for playing along! Happy writing!

Rules for posting to Wednesday Writing Challenge:

  1. Must be family friendly.
  2. Hate and intolerance will not be accepted.
  3. No pornography, erotica, graphic violence or excessive profanity.

Have fun. Be creative. And let’s write more words!

NaNo Prep For Non-Planners, Part One: Ideas

November is National Novel Writing Month. If you don’t know what that is, check out their website. This will be my eighth year to participate in this writing challenge. It’s tons of fun, if you’re into this sort of thing.

So far, each year I’ve jumped into this event with little to no plan at all. But this year, I’m doing things different. I’m going to spend a little time planning my novel before I start writing it. I thought it would be fun to invite you along with me.

Whether you’re a planner, or not, now’s the time to get started. And the place to start is generating ideas.

Where do ideas come from?
If you’re a writer, or any other sort of creative person, you know that ideas are out there, sort of floating about in the universe. No one really knows where they come from. You probably also know that those ideas can be a bit elusive, slippery, hard to hold on to sometimes.

Whether you are a NaNo participant or just trying to start a new writing project, here are a few plot generator websites that promise to get your creativity flowing:

  • This story starter site offers a sentence with a character and a scenario as a jumping off place for a new story. Writing for young people? There’s also a story starter version for kids.
  • Or try this Story Idea Generator which is similar to the first story starter site. 
  • This plot generator offers ideas for a variety of creative writing – short stories, films and more. It even breaks things down by genre – fantasy, paranormal romance and more. There’s even a category called Bronte Sisters.
  • Finally, this Random Plot Generator gives you the opportunity to mix and match various story elements – characters, setting, situation, etc – to find a combination that inspires you. 

These options are by no means perfect, but they can be a place to start.

Is my idea big enough for NaNo?
So you have an idea for a novel. Great! Then you sit down to write it only to run out of steam half way through. Ever happened to you?

I have a tiny little idea for a story that came to me a couple of years ago while I was in the middle of writing about three other novels. I wrote the idea down and set it aside. I didn’t have the time to pursue it right then. Now I’ve decided to pull it out for NaNo 2017. But it’s barely an idea. Little more than a character and a beginning.

How then, do you know if an idea is big enough to support an entire novel? Brainstorm. Play with the idea and build on it. Here are some brainstorming techniques that might help you build your idea into a full-size novel idea:

5 Brainstorming Strategies for Writers

Your assignment for NaNo Prep week one
If you’re just taking the first steps to writing your first novel, or if you’re like me, and don’t usually plan ahead for one, I hope you’ve found here some strategies to get started. This week, use the resources and ideas here and find and/or build on your novel idea.

Here are three questions to focus on:

  1. What is your story about?
  2. Where does your story take place?
  3. Who is telling your story?

Use the brainstorming exercises and see if you can come up with the premise, or theme, of your novel. Do the exercises suggest a location or time? Will you write in first person point of view or third person?

Best wishes to you on your noveling adventure! I hope these ideas and resources have been useful to you in some way. Next week, the focus will be on characters. Happy writing!

Wednesday Writing Prompt Challenge – October 4, 2017

Welcome to the Wednesday Writing Prompt Challenge! Join me in finding inspiration in unexpected places. Each week I post a new prompt intended to spark ideas for whatever writing project you’re working on—a journal entry, a poem, a short story. The possibilities are endless!

If you wish, consider sharing a link to your response in the comments below. There are a few simple rules, so please check them out below before posting.

What was your first bicycle like? Was it a gift, or did you earn money to buy it? Where did you ride?

Thanks for playing along! Happy writing!

Rules for posting to Wednesday Writing Challenge:

  1. Must be family friendly.
  2. Hate and intolerance will not be accepted.
  3. No pornography, erotica, graphic violence or excessive profanity.

Have fun. Be creative. And let’s write more words!

Wednesday Writing Prompt Challenge – September 27, 2017

Welcome to the Wednesday Writing Prompt Challenge! Join me in finding inspiration in unexpected places. Each week I post a new prompt intended to spark ideas for whatever writing project you’re working on—a journal entry, a poem, a short story. The possibilities are endless!

If you wish, consider sharing a link to your response in the comments below. There are a few simple rules, so please check them out below before posting.

Check your horoscope today, and then write how it compares with what you are actually experiencing in your life right now.

Thanks for playing along! Happy writing!

Rules for posting to Wednesday Writing Challenge:

  1. Must be family friendly.
  2. Hate and intolerance will not be accepted.
  3. No pornography, erotica, graphic violence or excessive profanity.

Have fun. Be creative. And let’s write more words!

Wednesday Writing Prompt Challenge – September 20, 2017

Welcome to the Wednesday Writing Prompt Challenge! Join me in finding inspiration in unexpected places. Each week I post a new prompt intended to spark ideas for whatever writing project you’re working on—a journal entry, a poem, a short story. The possibilities are endless!

If you wish, consider sharing a link to your response in the comments below. There are a few simple rules, so please check them out below before posting.

Reread the first paragraph of a book that you’ve read in the past year. Use this paragraph as the first paragraph in a new short story.

Thanks for playing along! Happy writing!

Rules for posting to Wednesday Writing Challenge:

  1. Must be family friendly.
  2. Hate and intolerance will not be accepted.
  3. No pornography, erotica, graphic violence or excessive profanity.

Have fun. Be creative. And let’s write more words!