The Queue, by Basma Abdel Aziz: A Review

Prompt #46 on the 2018 Reading Challenge was to read an allegory. Since I had the goal to read books written by women, I had some difficulty in finding a book that qualified. The usual suspects – The Chronicles of Narnia or Animal Farm – weren’t going to work for me. So I did some searching and found The Queue, by Basma Abdel Aziz on a list of books claiming to be allegories. I had previously run across this author when I was searching for women authors from all over the world.

The Queue primarily tells the story of Yehya who must get permission from The Gate for a critical medical procedure. The Gate is the symbol for the authoritarian government where Yehya lives. The line of people waiting outside for one reason or another grows and grows, yet The Gate never opens.

Abdel Aziz presents Yehya’s story through various side characters, each with their own connections to Yehya. Some, like Amani and Nagy, have a close, personal relationship with Yehya. They are outside the Queue, trying to help Yehya get what he needs. Other characters have a rather tenuous connection to Yehya. They are seeking their own help from the Queue, or they are trying to avoid entanglement with the Queue. But through all of them, this story is drawn to its inevitable conclusion.

Yehya would never admit that he was just a single, powerless man in a society where rules and restrictions were stronger than everything else, stronger than the ruler himself, stronger than the Booth and even the Gate.

This book presents a terrifyingly real look at how a totalitarian government can and will manipulate its citizens through fear, force, greed, even promises (though these last are usually left dangling and unfulfilled). And how such a government is capable of rearranging the truth to its own benefit.

One thought on “The Queue, by Basma Abdel Aziz: A Review

  1. Pingback: 2018 Reading Challenge – The Year of the Woman – TAwrites

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