The Tempest, by Shakespeare: a Review

This play joined my 2017 Reading Challenge on a whim. I’d been wanting to read some more Shakespeare again, but I didn’t know where I should start. I found an audio version of The Tempest as part of a collection with six other plays by other notable playwrights.

I listened to The Tempest and had a hard time following the story. I couldn’t tell who was who. I couldn’t keep track of the entrances and exits. Even with the voices of different actors, I simply could not follow the story at all.

I thought maybe this was due to the fact I was listening to a play without the benefits of seeing the action. A play, after all, is meant to be seen. I wanted to like it. Or at the very least, to appreciate it. So I found a print version, and I read it. However, I still had difficulties following along.

I’ve enjoyed other works of Shakespeare. But somehow this one escapes me. I just couldn’t get into it.

The audio book I chose to listen to is Seven Classic Plays, narrated by a full cast and published by Blackstone Audio. Several of the other plays I did enjoy, leaving me to conclude it wasn’t simply a lack of visuals that kept me from enjoying The Tempest.

The other plays include:

  • Medea, by Euripides
  • The Imaginary Invalid, by Moliere
  • The Lady of the Camilias, by Alexandre Dumas
  • An Enemy of the People, by Henrik Ibsen
  • Arms and the Man, George Bernard Shaw
  • Uncle Vanya, Anton Chekov

I loved Arms and the Man, it was by far my favorite of the seven. The Imaginary Invalid was hilarious. The Lady of the Camilias was beautifully tragic. An Enemy of the People and Medea were at least interesting, but not especially memorable for me personally. And Uncle Vanya was, like Shakespeare’s play, difficult to follow.

The cast that performed these plays for this audio book did a fantastic job. But I do think there is something lost in simply listening to a play rather than witnessing it. A play is a visual thing. It is intended to be seen, and preferably live in a theatre. In this way, the audience becomes part of the play itself, not simply an outside observer.

In the end, I’m still looking for a Shakespeare play to read, and hopefully enjoy. What is your favorite piece by Shakespeare? Is there another playwright you particularly like?

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One thought on “The Tempest, by Shakespeare: a Review

  1. Pingback: 2017 Reading Challenge, Reprise – TAwrites

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